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About the Author

I have been involved in Learning & Development for over 15 years in Australia, and the UK. Having worked with a range of public and private business in both private and public sector. I have seen a lot of what works and also a lot of what doesn't. I believe that with the right tools, guidance and support anyone can train better on the job.

Oct 09

The 3 ways to generate greater sales & increase revenue

By PE Admin | Video

If you run a coffee shop, bar or restaurant, there are 3 ways your teams can increase your sales & revenue.

Stay tuned because in this video we are going to look at how your teams can easily generate more sales in each of the 3 areas, and why you can’t just focus on one.

It may seem rather obvious, but the secret to greater sales starts with your existing customers.

1. The first and easiest way to increase sales is to sell more to your existing customers.

Remember a customer has come to your venue for a reason, whether it is to buy a coffee, cocktail or a plate of food.

So If you provide them with a great experience and great product then the chances are they are going to buy more.

But remember you have lots of competition and your customer has lots of choices. If your team don’t do their job right and create a great experience and great product for your customers, then why would they want to stay.

2. The second way to increase sales is to up-sell and cross sell to your existing customers.

This means selling additional items such as a cake with a coffee, a side or fries with a burger or suggesting a more expensive product such as bottle of wine rather than a glass or a premium beer or cocktail.

The challenge with upselling and cross selling is that to encourage the customer to pay more money, they need to trust your products as well as the staff member making the recommendation.

To help build trust with your customers that encourages them to want to buy more, your teams need to know their product, they need to understand the guests needs and provide a personalised experience.

3. The third and hardest way to generate greater sales and revenue is to get more customers to visit and buy.

This the most expensive and time-consuming way as it requires marketing and promotions.

However getting new customers to come and buy is only part of the challenge, the risk is that if your team don’t provide a great experience and great product for each new customer, they will leave and never come back.

But here is the irony. If your teams consistently provide great experiences and great products to your existing customers, they become your best source of advertising as they promote your business to their friends, colleagues and on-line communities.

So there we have it the 3 ways a coffee shop, bar or restaurant can generate greater sales & revenue.

If you focus on your existing customers by consistently providing great experiences and great products, they will want to return, you will find it easier to upsell and cross sell to and they will help bring more customers.

If you like this video there are 3 things you can do

1. leave a comment below

2. Subscribe to our You tube channel for more free videos like this.

3. Get more free training tools and techniques by visiting our website at www.profitablemployee.com

My name is Ian from profitable employee.com, helping you improve performance, increase productivity and generate more profit

May 17

Why your 4-star rating is affecting your sales and revenue

By PE Admin | Hospitality , Posts

For many years, the customer services and hospitality industries have touted the importance of customer satisfaction and how it leads to customer loyalty. But do we really understand what the scores mean, and how they are affecting your business?

Lets start by looking at two important terms

Customer Satisfaction

Customer Satisfaction is a measurement of each customer’s attitudes towards your products, services, and their overall experience.

The aim of measuring customer satisfaction is to find out:

  1. Are your customers happy with your product or services?
  2. What areas can you improve on to make the experience better
  3. Are customers willing to come back and buy more and/or promote you to friends and colleagues.

The most common and easiest way to measure customer satisfaction is by using rating scales that ask customers to rate a variety of factors from quality, taste, speed, friendliness of staff etc. Where customers rate their feelings from 1 to 5 (sometimes 10 ) to measure their levels of satisfaction.

Customer loyalty

Customer Loyalty refers to a customer’s behaviour and how they choose a shop, product or brand over another.

Customer loyalty is harder to measure but is often scored on repeat business and sales. Common ways to measure loyalty is using loyalty cards and frequent user points systems (the ones that offer a free item after so many sold or get points for further discounts).

Does Satisfaction create Loyalty

It is fair to assume if we satisfy customers that they will become loyal and as long as we are satisfying our customers they will be happy to return and buy more. RIGHT.

Well actually NO.

Customer satisfaction does not create customer loyalty.

To explain this lets look at two common myths about customer satisfaction.

Myth 1 - Customers who repeatedly buy from you are both satisfied and loyal.

Just because a customer is buying from you may make them satisfied but does not make them loyal. If you think about it there are many reasons why a customer returns to buy from you, including:

  • The convenience of your location,
  • Your low prices and promotions
  • You have a product they like
  • Your staff are friendly and likeable
  • Someone else is paying the bill

These do not encourage loyal behaviour, instead if these are the main motivators of your customers, this means that your customers see this as a transactional relationship, where they pay for and receive a product or service; where they will return only as long as their basic needs are met, or until they can find somewhere else who meets their needs better.

In much the same way that customers are happy to swap shopping centres to buy their weekly groceries depending on weekly sales.

Myth 2 - Satisfaction scores are an accurate indicator of a customer loyalty

Let’s assume we run a customer survey asking customers to rate us from 1 – 5. The logical assumption is that for every point increase the level of loyalty also increases. Much like the follow graph.

But this is not the case.

The reality is that satisfying customers is not enough, remember customers have come to your coffee shop, bar or restaurant for a reason. Their expectation is to leave satisfied, anything less would leave a feeling of resentment, anger and even the feeling of being ripped off.

In 1997 Harvard professors Heskett, Sasser and Schlesinger identified that there were 3 zones or levels of satisfaction, which created 3 specific behaviours.

Heskett J, Sasser WE and Schlesinger LA, The Service Profit Chain, 1997

Zone of Defection – (Rating 1 – 3.5 out of 5)

Customers who receive poor and ordinary products and services are in this zone. These customer will rarely complain, leave and then take their business elsewhere. Then they will actively bad mouth and tell others to stay away. It is estimated that these people will tell up to 12 others about their experiences as well as posting their experience on-line.

Zone of Indifference (Rating 3-5 - 4.5 out of 5)

Here your customers are happy with the product and service, and possibly even the price. They have had a nice experience but they are not ‘wowed’ by it. Customers in this zone might come again but you have lots of competition who are better located, have the same or better variety or cheaper prices.

Sadly, this is the rating most moderately successful businesses receive. Remember customers feel the experience was good but not great, they are happy but no loyal.

Zone of Affection (Rating 4.5 – 5 out of 5)

Your customers love what you do and how you make them feel, they will actively walk further to get to you, promote you to their friends and even be willing to pay more for the experience. These are you ‘raving fans’.

These are also quite often the smallest group of customers.

How to us this in the workplace.

Business need to applaud themselves for getting good customer feedback and satisfaction scores. But they also need to get real about how well they are doing and how their products and services could be costing them sales & revenue.

Remember customers who are in the

  • defection zone (rating you between 0 – 3.5) are bad mouthing you as we speak
  • indifference zone (rating you between 3.5 - 4.5) will still shop around.
  • Affection zone (rating you between 4.5 – 5) will love and promote you, but only as long as you keep them feeling this way.

Ways to help build your rating scores include:

  • Be good at a few things not everything
  • Focus on quality and consistency
  • Focus on the customer experience
  • Ask customers for feedback often
  • Ask customers to post their feedback on-line so others can find it
  • Review your rating scores and share them with the team

If you like what you have read feel free to leave comments and feedback below, or check out more training tools and tips like this on our website at www.profitableemployee.com

May 03

PEEDA – The 5-step performance feedback conversation model that works.

By PE Admin | Posts

PEEDA – The 5-step performance feedback conversation model that works.

One of the most powerful tools any manager or trainer can have is the ability to give constructive performance feedback. Effective feedback helps employees to learn how their attitude, skills and behaviour is impacting their performance, their team and the customers whom they serve.

But too often mangers (many without realising it) either fail to provide feedback altogether or give poor feedback which demotivates and disengages their team members, which runs the risk of contributing to future poor performance.

So, let’s see how you can use our simple 5 step model to giving performance feedback that works?

The Goal of giving feedback

The goal of giving feedback is to achieve two things.

  1. As Motivation - To motivate employees to continue performing or to change their behaviour.
  2. As a learning experience so they can walk away from the conversation knowing what they have done well or what they need to improve on.

Giving positive feedback to encourage performance

Giving positive feedback can be something as simple as a ‘thank you’ or personal compliment.   Done often this will help to motivate and encourage your team to keep doing good work.

After all, don’t we all like to know when we are doing a good job.

Giving negative feedback to change performance

The challenge of giving negative feedback is that you need to deliver it in a way that helps build and strengthen your relationship with the employee as well as encouraging them to change their behaviour or attitude. This way the employee understands that the feedback was given to help them and not just as a form of criticism.

The golden rule of giving negative feedback to improve performance is that it needs to be a conversation, and not just the manager telling the employee what they did or did not do.

The risk of one way feedback is that because the employee can discuss or defend their actions it increases the likelihood that they will become demotivated and take the feedback as a personal attack.

Rules to giving feedback

The rule to giving both positive and negative feedback is to:

  • Do it frequently (not just in a monthly one to one or yearly appraisal)
  • Do it at the right time (i.e. as soon as possible)
  • Do it in person
  • Do it in a way that suits the employee (i.e. for positive feedback not everyone likes public displays and accolades, for negative feedback don’t do it in public as it is demeaning to the employee and only discredits your influence with the rest of the team)
  • Be consistent  (There are no favourites or enemies, treat the team the same)

The PEEDA Feedback Conversation Model

Welcome the PEEDA the performance feedback conversation model. A simple and easy 5 stage model you can use to have a performance management conversation.

PEEDAR is an acronym that stands for

Purpose

Expectations

Examples

Discuss

Actions

So, let’s look at each of the PEEDA steps

Step 1 – Purpose

You begin the conversation by highlighting the purpose of the discussion, this helps explain to the employee WHY you are having the conversation,

The purpose also helps to set the tone of the conversation, for example, beginning a conversation with

‘I am a little concerned about what happened in that meeting and I want to discuss it with you’

will create a different response to

‘This is the third and final time that I am prepared to talk to you about your aggressive behaviour in the team meetings.'
Step 2 – Expectations

In the next step, you need to highlight the standards of service, or team behaviours that you expect. You can even discuss your own feelings about the employees work or actions.

By discussing the expectations, you create a very clear boundary around the discussion helping to identify what good performance looks like, and how you are measuring their recent performance.

“In team meetings, I expect that all employees have the opportunity to be able to voice their opinions without being yelled at or intimidated”
Step 3 - Examples

The next stage is to provide relevant and recent examples where the employee has demonstrated examples of their performance or behaviour.

You need to use current facts and data that support the discussion. These could be examples of work they have done, feedback from others as well as your own observations.

‘I have noticed in the last two team meetings you have responded aggressively when others in the team disagreed with your point of view. ’

Providing facts helps to focus the discussion on the employee and their performance or behaviour and not them as a person.

Step 4 – Discussion

The discussion phase should be the longest part of the conversation as it allows you and the employee to discuss each of the examples in more detail.

“Can you tell me why you reacted that way?”

Your aim is to get them to do most of the talking and you do this by asking questions that encourage the employee to think about each example in 3 ways.

  1. Their Reality – Why they behaved that way’
  2. The Impact – What are the potential impacts of their behaviour
  3. The Options – What could/ will happen if they continue;

Here you can help them to identify what are the areas they feel they should continue doing and what do they need to focus on improving

To help the conversation achieve its purpose always refer to the previous 3 steps to prevent it from breaking down or losing its impact.

‘I want to discuss your behaviour, not anyone else’s.  I will discuss other team members behaviour issues with them directly’

It is also important to understand that an employee’s behaviour or performance can be affected by external issues such as lack of resources, lack of support or other factors. These should be identified in the discussion phase.

Step 5 – Actions

The final stage is to agree on actions and next steps for both the employee and you their manager. Ask the employee to commit and take ownership of their behaviour and the potential impact it has.

‘Ok so we have discussed how by you getting aggressive in team meetings is causing friction with others. In the future if you disagree with any points raised what are you going to do differently?’

And finally seek agreement...........

Are you prepared to do this?

Obviously, you need to approve their decision and give feedback about how you can support or manage their behaviour moving forward.

What next 

By following the PEEDA model you should have identified all the causes of any negative behaviour.  When done correctly both parties leave with a sense of purpose with the guidance and expectations of what needs to be done next.

So, there we have it the PEEDA feedback conversation model; use it next time you are giving constructive feedback for performance management.

Let us know your thoughts.  

Apr 27

The 5 rules to energising your team to deliver exceptional workplace performance

By PE Admin | Posts , Productivity

A lesson from the scout’s movement.

How is it that a group of volunteers, unpaid community leaders can inspire, lead and manage a large group of 1300 children and teenagers aged from 4 to 18 years old cubs, explores, scouts and beavers (junior cubs, not the animal) to march for 1 mile in an orderly file, sit still for a 30 min ceremony, sing and dance and then march them in file for a final parade. All the time while singing and laughing.

What was the secret: What magical power was summoned to encourage this mob of mini people to be engaged, attentive and behave for 2 ½ hours?

The truth was there was no magic but instead a very simple set of unwritten rules that have been perfected and used with outstanding effect.

1. A common sense of purpose: everyone knew their role and what needed to be done, march the street to celebrate the scouting movement for St Georges day

2. Simple instructions: Follow the person in front, march and have fun

3. Simple boundaries: Stay with your group and keep each other safe

4. Continuous support from their peers and leaders: Everyone encourages each other, if someone walked out of line or out of step then their friends would encourage them to get back in step. If one of them slowed they would be joined by others until they were able to keep up with the group. If they were too tired then someone would walk with them at their pace.

The leader did not yell, scream or chastise their pack, instead kept on encouraging them to keep up the good effort and to keep having fun.

5. Support from the crowd: Cheers and claps of encouragement and good will from the spectators and proud parents who lined the streets, encouraging not only their own children but everyone else’s as well.

This weekend I had the privilege to watch my son and his scout group join with 21 other scout groups in the local area meet and celebrate St Georges Day (The Scout's patron saint). I witnessed something amazing happen that all business could learn from.

If a group of unpaid volunteers and scout leaders could achieve this with an unruly, and undisciplined mob of 1300 children made up of pre-and post-pubescent teenagers many of whom I have no doubt have the attention span of the average goldfish (approx. 3 – 6 seconds).

NOW IMAGINE what you could achieve with your own teams if you followed these simple rules.

Of these 5 rules, what are you doing well and which ones could you improve?

Let me know your thoughts.

Apr 27

The 4 stages of learning and how to apply it in the workplace

By PE Admin | Hospitality , Posts , Productivity

Learning is a continuous process

We are constantly taking in cues from our experiences and adapting our knowledge, skills and behaviour based on how we apply our learning. Employees learn through exploring, trial and error, thinking about the experience and adapting their learning based on their personal needs and circumstances.

Employees can draw upon their current knowledge and experiences to help them to determine the value and usefulness of any learning experience. After every interaction, they will mentally map their new learning with what they already know and understand to create new meaning, or reinforce their current understanding.

Example - Complaint handling

Experience Employee

  • Relating it back to previous times they have dealt with complaints
  • Identifying successful and unsuccessful complaint resolution examples

Inexperience Employee

  • Relate to being a customer with a complaint
  • Identifying positive and negative complaint resolution examples as a customer

Through each learning experience employees can create their own understanding by linking their current understanding of the subject or experience and then apply it to their reality.

It doesn’t matter what we are learning as we always go through the same process. The more we think about or practice work-based tasks, the more we refine our ideas and form habits.

Our experience has shown that there are 3 Active learning stages and 1 continuous thinking stage. Through each of the stages of the learning process, we are processing meaning to our experiences, this allows us to use, modify or reject information based on what we believe is relevant.

Active Learning Stage

Continuous Thinking Learning stage

Experience It – We are engaged in a learning event (either formal or informal)

Process it – We continuously interpret our learning based on our current levels of understanding and experience

Practice it – We place our learning into practice

Apply it – Put our learning into practice

The 4 stage workplace learning model

Adapted from Kolb’s Experiential learning model - 'Experiential Learning: Experience As The Source Of Learning And Development' 1984

This model identifies that after each of the active stages of learning the employee is constantly processing the data based on the experience, helping them to create meaning, adapt their understanding, store relevant data, disregard irrelevant data.

Do you like what you have read?  Tell us your thoughts,

Apr 22

How to train employees to learn more skills

By PE Admin | Leadership , Posts , Productivity

Employees learn skills in stages

As we learn new skills we will go through 4 stages. Each stage has two measures

  • Awareness The level of conscious thought on a topic or skills
  • Ability The level that something can be done.

The Awareness to Ability learning process demonstrates how each employee goes through the different stages from being first aware to forming habits.

Adapted from “Four Stages for Learning Any New Skill”, Noel Burch from Gordon Training International (1970)

Stage 1 - Unaware & Unable

During this stage, an individual lacks the awareness of the needed skills, knowledge and capacity to do a certain task

Imagine that you are responsible for teaching a group of trainees how to use a new computer programme for processing customer complaints.   Before seeing the programme in action the employee/s are unaware of its capabilities or how it works.

Stage 2 - Aware & Unable

During this stage the induvial becomes aware of their lack of knowledge and skill.

After attending a training session employees become aware of the computer programme and its features and functions. They become aware of it but do not know how to use it

Stage 3 - Aware & Able

Through practice they start to develop and retain the needed knowledge and skills, however progress is slow. You know when people are going through this stage as they are constantly talking to themselves as they complete the task.

After a week they have had a chance to practice using the new software and each of the employees is able to use some of the basic functions, however, progress is slow these take time and effort to do. In this phase the progress is generally slow

Stage 4 - Unaware & Able

After a period of time and repeated use the individual can is able to complete the task without conscious thought, tasks are done quickly. It is at this stage that habits are starting to form (both good and bad) as each employee finds ways to do their job easily

It is now 7 weeks after the training, and the employees have been using the software daily, each employee is becoming both very competent and confident using the computer programme. They are able to use the general features of the programme with minimal thought, completing tasks with ease, almost as though they are on auto pilot

How to apply

When training employees it is important to be aware which stage each of your employee is at so that you can adapt your training to support their development needs. All training needs to move from a teaching style (telling and directing) for employees new to the knowledge and skills where they need to learn each of the steps and stages to a more coaching style (asking and guiding) when they are competent at doing the task but need to build their confidence or willingness to implement their training on the job.

When training you teams you need to ensure that each employees learning is focused on their current stage of ability; this means tailoring your delivery to suit their progress and development. Teach when you need to, but also give them a chance to practice and figure it out for themselves. Offer support and guidance in a timely manner, being sure to give constructive feedback to praise good behaviours and correct negative ones.

Apr 13

Employees learn skills in stages

By PE Admin | Uncategorized

Employees learn skills in stages

As we learn new skills we will go through 4 stages. Each stage has two measures

  • Awareness The level of conscious thought on a topic or skills
  • Ability The level that something can be done.

The Awareness to Ability learning process demonstrates how each employee goes through the different stages from being first aware to forming habits.

Adapted from “Four Stages for Learning Any New Skill”, Noel Burch from Gordon Training International (1970)

Stage 1 - Unaware & Unable

During this stage, an individual lacks the awareness of the needed skills, knowledge and capacity to do a certain task

Imagine that you are responsible for teaching a group of trainees how to use a new computer programme for processing customer complaints.

Before seeing the programme in action the employee/s are unaware of its capabilities or how it works.

Stage 2 - Aware & Unable

During this stage the induvial becomes aware of their lack of knowledge and skill.

After attending a training session employees become aware of the computer programme and its features and functions.

They become aware of it but do not know how to use it

Stage 3 - Aware & Able

Through practice they start to develop and retain the needed knowledge and skills, however progress is slow. You know when people are going through this stage as they are constantly talking to themselves as they complete the task.

After a week they have had a chance to practice using the new software and each of the employees is able to use some of the basic functions, however, progress is slow these take time and effort to do. In this phase the progress is generally slow

Stage 4 - Unaware & Able

After a period of time and repeated use the individual can is able to complete the task without conscious thought, tasks are done quickly. It is at this stage that habits are starting to form (both good and bad) as each employee finds ways to do their job easily

It is now 7 weeks after the training, and the employees have been using the software daily, each employee is becoming both very competent and confident using the computer programme. They are able to use the general features of the programme with minimal thought, completing tasks with ease, almost as though they are on auto pilot

When training employees it is important to be aware which stage each of your employee is at so that you can adapt your training to support their development needs. All training needs to move from a teaching style (telling and directing) for employees new to the knowledge and skills where they need to learn each of the steps and stages to a more coaching style (asking and guiding) when they are competent at doing the task but need to build their confidence or willingness to implement their training on the job.

When training you teams you need to ensure that each employees learning is focused on their current stage of ability; this means tailoring your delivery to suit their progress and development. Teach when you need to, but also give them a chance to practice and figure it out for themselves. Offer support and guidance in a timely manner, being sure to give constructive feedback to praise good behaviours and correct negative ones.

Apr 13

Why your employee’s performance drops before it will get better after training.

By PE Admin | Hospitality , Posts , Productivity

One of the main goals of workplace training is to improve individual’s and team’s performance.

Let’s assume you want to introduce a new procedure on how to deal with customer complaints. It seems quite logical to assume that after someone has received training they will get better more confident and better at dealing with complaints, and customer service will increase. Right?

Unfortunately, it is not as simple as that.

The reality is when employees are learning something new like a new business process or procedure or how to use new tools and technology it is normal for general productivity and performance to drop. Even the experienced employees.

The reason is simple; as the new information or skill is learned the employee needs time to process and practice it in the learning environment before they can practice and adapt it to their job. In many cases, they may even need to unlearn old habits to accommodate for the new way of doing things.

"the employee needs time to process and practice it in the learning environment before they can practice and adapt it to their job."

Why does it happen?

It doesn’t matter if the learner is experienced or new to the role, all employees will have a drop in productivity as they go thought each of the learning stages from awareness to practice to experience and finally to form the new habit.

The challenge is to ensure that the length of time from discovery to competence is as quick as possible.

To make it more challenging this will be dependent on each employee’s current level of ability and their willingness to change.

As an in-house trainer, our job is to provide effective direction and opportunities for them to practice. We then need to consistently reinforce the positive behaviours and correct the negative ones quickly, by providing regular feedback about each employee’s progress.

So next time you are looking to introduce something new into the workplace like technology, software or new procedures make sure you are supporting them adequately to compensate for potential changes in service speed and quality.

Tips to reduce the time to greater performance

  • Keep customers informed that you are looking to improve your service, and there may be some small changes happening.
  • Give employees chances to learn and practice in a non-customer focusing environment
  • Provide additional resources to support any drops in service or productivity
  • Reinforce learning constantly in team meetings and daily huddles
  • Have an effective way to monitor performance to support your teams
  • Praise positive behaviours/ learning
  • Correct negative ones quickly
  • Encourage healthy competition between employees

If you like what you have read, feel free to leave a comment or feedback below.

Apr 11

4 essentials to better workplace memory

By PE Admin | Posts , Productivity

Are you struggling with team members who just don’t remember their training?

Do you find some of your teams are performing better than others?

In this article, I am going to show you the 4 essential steps better memory and retention to help make your training more memorable, so that training sticks and is used in the workplace.

Studies have shown that after a training or learning session most people will generally forget up to 80% of what they have been taught within 24 – 48 hours.

people will generally forget up to 80% of what they have been taught within 24 – 48 hours.

This is quite alarming because it means on average that only as little as 20% will be remembered.

But it gets more challenging because each employee will take away a different 20%.

Why is this happening?

There are many reasons why people forget. However, there are some simple rules to follow to help people remember.

Generally people are more likely to remember things based on how it benefits them and we can look at this in 3 areas:

  • We remember things that are relevant to both of our personal and work lives; like the password to a computer or our work schedule for the week.
  • We remember things that are useful like information that supports our view on the world or, is helpful. Like how to use the coffee machine at work. And
  • We also remember information that has an emotional connection such as information that helps us stay happy, safe and secure. Like when to avoid asking the boss for help when you notice they are in a bad mood.

The 4 steps to memory & retention

So next time you are training remember these 4 simple steps and your team will remember more and achieve more consistent results.

Step 1. The first step is to discuss the relevance of what they are learning. you can do this by linking it to the business needs

Like improving efficiency or decreasing complaints

The second part of relevance is to identify the benefit to the employee. By answering the question 'What's In It For Me' (WIIFM). How will the learning help make their job easier, more enjoyable or less stressful.

An example may be

Complaints handling training = more confidence + knowing what to do

The second stage is to Repeat the essential information that each employee must know or do throughout the training session. However, repeating information verbally is not enough.

When you repeat the information you need to use a variety of methods to help your learners by engaging a range of their senses. You can use

  • Visuals - posters, images, video
  • Audio – Group Discussion, and Q&A
  • Reading/ Writing – manuals and how to guides
  • Kinaesthetic – through practice, role plays or demonstrations

Step 3 is to reinforce their learning in the workplace as soon as possible. This enables employees to practice their learning on the job which helps to build their understanding of how it applies to them.

  • Knowledge can be reinforced through pop quizzes, discussions in team meetings or asking how they may apply their learning in a relevant workplace scenario
  • Practical Skills can be reinforced by doing the tasks daily as part of their job and by teaching others.
  • Attitude and behaviour can be reinforced through one on one coaching and by getting feedback from others.

The final step is to review the impact of the training and how the employees have used it in the workplace.

Here we look back to the relevance; We need to Look at the desired outcome of the training (have you achieved your business goals).

The second part of the review is to ask how employees how they have used their learning and what benefits have they seen. Asking these questions will demonstrate to them the value and importance of what they have learned.

Best of all because most of the learning is happening in the workplace it means that you can do each of the 4 steps as part of your daily routine.

So there we have it, although we can’t stop people from forgetting we can help them to remember. Next time you are training use the 4 essential steps to improving workplace memory.

Do you like what you have read?  if so leave a comment below and tell us what you think.